About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
Today 8
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWS 44
MSNBCW 33
CNNW 30
CNN 29
MSNBC 29
FBC 28
KGO (ABC) 13
KQED (PBS) 13
KPIX (CBS) 11
CNBC 10
WRC (NBC) 9
WUSA (CBS) 9
KRCB (PBS) 8
KNTV (NBC) 7
WMAR (ABC) 7
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 391
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 391 (some duplicates have been removed)
plan. >> excellence. >> well executed. >> i thank you. >> a lot of criticism of fema back in katrina. today we hear nothing but good about fema. >> i thank craig would lives and breathes this stuff. >>neil: not so fast because all in rescueville is not so great. a lot of the folks they represent would like to kick them in the ass. this is the reality. welcome, everyone, not so happy friday. mr. president, you may want to wait on the "heck of a job" thing because rescue efforts have become heck of a joke for folks in the northeast fuming. because the help isn't coming. in gas. no power. no food. they have had it. >> restaurants and boats and homes are looted. >> the coast guard has not been here to help. >> come here and walk into the streets here. the water is this high. you have to wear the waders. >>neil: that is just on staten island. homes are swamps. motorists are stuck if -- in gas lines, four hours or more if you can find a place to fill in. two-thirds of gas stations even now in new york and new jersey remain shut down. out of juice. out of gas. thousands are fuming, out of p
their roovs two days after sandy, in scenes reminiscent of katrina. also reports of a desperate search for two children, swept away from their mom in the storm surge. and then word that the death toll had nearly doubled to 14. it was becoming clear that staten island, a sleepy enclave best known as the name sake for the famous staten island ferry, was a world away from the rest of this city which today was getting moving again. so, we hopped in the car outside of our office in manhattan, expecting a journey that would be made very difficult by the city's maddening post-storm grid lock. instead, the real problems became getting gas. we drove around northern new jersey for hours encountering lines and frustrated people. >> aggravating. that storm did its thing. knocked out everything. >> reporter: we were only saved by some relatives of one of our colleagues who brought us a two-gallon jug of gas. >> just keep it. >> reporter: it's okay. finally, we arrived. and look at what we saw next from our window. >> the transformer blew up and took the whole store down. that's my open sign to the store. i
a will surpass those fom hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countlessse businesses hurt, others could see a boost.se erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed treesand damage to transportation networks, it could takandays-- if not weeks,i to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be thets most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the mt serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will lielyly surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they won't get back. insurance companies will have tu make big payouts, which will likely mean hiher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predic
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island. ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here a
hurricane katrina in 2005, the governor said that sandy's damage was actually more widespread. >> when you look at the number of homes and businesses affected, this storm affected many, many more people in places than katrina. and arguably, therefore, this created more housing and economic damage than katrina. >>> new jersey which suffered massive damage to its transit system and coastline estimates that it nearly has $30 billion in damage. >>> u.n. ambassador susan rice is heading to capitol hill today to meet with some of her toughest republican critics and answer questions about the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. rice will sit down with senators john mccain, lindsey graham, and kelly ayotte. >> that should be fun. >> that could be really awkward. they all accuse her of misleading the country in her initial account of the attack. in recent days, senator mccain has softened his criticism, and rice insists that she was relying on talking points from the intelligence community. last night senator graham rejected her defense but says he's open to today's meeting. >>
repetitive. it dulls the ears. here he doesn't have to mention bush. it's in everyone's head. katrina is recalled with the im. talk about fema, people think about the bush legacy. and so, he doesn't have make those contrastic splits, never mind about mitt romney, that helps him because he's doing stuff and it's all out there without the effort. >> you get the unearned assist from michael brown coming out. >> we'll talk about brownie. >> you couldn't ask for that. you couldn't make that bet. >> but there's karen welcome. hi. >> welcome to the show. i want to say, it's not just the presidential thing. it's also -- there's incredibly moving -- let's not forget the human toll this storm's taken. >> absolutely. >> the images of the president consoling americans in the wake of this massive disaster are incredibly powerful images. and what you heard in the president, what you heard from the president on the stump just now was empathy, this sense that he is fighting for you, that you have a seat at the table, middle class, working class americans, that he is there for you. and that fundamenta
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. >> eric: may i bring -- >> bob -- holdon. >> kimberly: by the way, what happened to bush and katrina? did they do the same thing? it's okay there, but not here. being politically expedient again? >> bob: there are 77 people dead. romney and his people talk about how obama was not prepared. >> greg: you talk about climate change. >> eric: let me do this. i'll bring this back to why i put the two things in the same segment, bob. here is why. we gave him $1 trillion. the administration $1 trillion to beef up the infrastructure. they spent $1 trillion making the grid. burying the grid underground so that every time it's 50-mile-per-hour wind we don't have half the country losing power. that would have been a good use of stimulus money. better use. >> bob: bury new jersey under the ground in four years? >> eric: let me put it this way. $1 trillion closer to getting it done. what did we get with the money we spent? >> kimberly: nothing. >> bob: republicans have to think of something besides sandy to make a case in the final four days. >> greg: that is the point. >> dana: romney did not. what he
to realize that this is our katrina. >> the obama administration responded to complaints that fema was late on the scene and anountsed that the deputy administrator will be there tomorrow and fema wants everyone who needs assistance to call. when there's complaintcomplaint because they haven't been able to reach out. 1- 800-621-fema or disast disasterassistance.gov. >>> president obama was back on the trail. >> in new jersey yesterday and saw the devastation and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot of people. but you know, we've been inspired these past few days. because when disaster strikes, we see america at its best. the consumer in these times all seem to melt away. there are no democrats or republicans during the storm. just fellow americans. >> his response to the storm has earned him big praise. 78% approve of how he's dealt with the hurricane. images and headlines like this have helped, too, featuring chris christie of new jersey on a bipartisan storm damage tour together from wednesday. but not everyone's a fan of the federal agencies that handle
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
called out. >> greg: who can forget the huffington post reporting cannibalism in hurricane katrina. the amount of exaggeration going on toemonize president bush is beyond the pa even happe because media is more interested to stress bipartisan than that. to me would never have happened if mccain was president. >> andrea: there was a difference -- look at the response to hurricane katrina. president bush demonized, wasn't doing enough. >> bob: because fema was a joke of an agency then. horse trader was running it. now everybody who has dealt with fema in this storm gave them praise. >> eric: i love you like a brother but the people who are, you know, there is a makeshift morgue in a school in staten island. there are people who are without power. you saw the people without food, power. fema is not doing their job. there are people struggling and suffering. >> bob: how many people do you think fema has? >> eric: i don't know. bring people in. >> bob: bring some people in. you think they couldn't bring neem, they wouldn't bring neem? they'd let staten island sink? >> eric: apparently t
that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodies, and revise upward the count of the dead. and now frustration and fear of the future haunt many, as homeowners scramble to salvage whatever is left and ask when the pain and suffering will stop. and to the long gaslines and impassable roads, broken infrastructure, and lost hours of work and schools add this weather alert. to those living without power in those houses comes word that the temperatures are cooling. down to the low 30s for tonight, and for the next several nights. and much worse than the cold. another nor easter, another wet and windy storm this way comes. >> and bad weather, ladies and gentlemen, the last thing the battered burrough of stat ten eileen need. let's fine out what else mother now has in store. meteorologist justin poric, what's going on? >> well, geraldo, this is the last thing that residents of in the northeast want to think about, a potential storm. this will not be sandy. will not be a big
of cars flooded and destroyed by super storm sandy, it could exceed that of katrina. watch out, coming up a man who sold more than his fair share of cars. cofounder and former ceo of car max on what mr. obama's reelection means for our economy. and a selloff on wall street, a wild ride for commodities, just look at the gold chart. up next off chicago on whether we might see a continuation tomorrow. we are coming right back. liz: several commodities tanks today following the election result. david: phil flynn at the price futures group joins us now. i don't want to barrel th. the lead, but why didn't gold take off? one of the main factors will be continuation of fed values that raise the dollar value of gold. why didn't it pop more than it did? >> i think because of the concerns over europe. when we are concerned about europe it is always bearish for gold. why is that? if the euro zone falls apart, wanting to have a value is gold. that we have even seen is a possibility of a way out of this mess. even talking "wall street journal" the possibility of goldbach eurobonds as a solution to try
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
't know what he shot about. he hot his mouth about katrina and we have seen record low levels. andrew cuomo linked climate change to sandy yesterday. >> steve: a county plans to move forward with a gun tax. under the plan will be a $25 tax on the fire arms and a plan to tax bullets. but the board dropped that because it would be more than the costs of ammunition. >> giant tiger shark. maria, a black belt was swimming in maui. and the shark confronted her and she gave it a best punch in the nose. she got more than a hundred stitchos her hand and thigh. >> steve: that's what you are supposed to do. >> gretchen: a woman was told her bible shirt was offensive. they made her cover tup with a jacket. they say it violates election laws and the attorney said he wants an apology or there will be a lawsuit. >> steve: is the on the ballot there? >> that shirt is permissible. keep the shirt on. >> steve: 20 minutes before the top of the hour. navy seals outraged over what happened in benghazi posted this on facebook. but facebook took it down. doesn't that vialate people's use of free speech. the
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 391 (some duplicates have been removed)